What's the best way to dual boot Linux and Windows?

Having trouble with your Linux system?

What's the best way to dual boot Linux and Windows?

Postby Tracey Lowndes » Sun Nov 06, 2016 6:03 pm

I am thinking of buying a new computer, and I was thinking of dual booting Linux and Windows 10.

But what's the best way to do that?

1. Two hard disks, one for Linux and the other for Windows.

2. One hard disk with both Linux and Windows on it.

3. One hard disk with Linux only on it, and Windows in Virtualbox.

Or, should I just run Linux with no Windows at all, and use LibreOffice?

One factor to consider - I'm thinking of having Microsoft Office 365 and I'm unsure how it would run in Virtualbox if I take the third option.

So what do you think?

Thanks in advance.
Tracey Lowndes
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2014 8:11 pm

Re: What's the best way to dual boot Linux and Windows?

Postby richmond62 » Mon Nov 07, 2016 6:13 pm

Microsoft 365 is web-based, so it shouldn't really matter which OS your computer is running.

However: I've yet (after about 15 years) to work out what sufficient advantages there are in using Microsoft Office
over WPS (Kingsoft Office), EuroOffice, OpenOffice or LibreOffice to justify paying money.

My wife owns a Macbook Air that came with Microsoft Office bundled in it, and uses LibreOffice as she find the
interface far, far easier to use than the Microsoft one.

I'd go for single boot Linux, and IFF there is something that is 'vital' written for Windows that WINE cannot cope
with I'd run Windows in some sort of Virtualisation environment such as VMWare Player.
richmond62
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2016 4:56 pm
Location: Bulgaria

Re: What's the best way to dual boot Linux and Windows?

Postby Tracey Lowndes » Mon Nov 07, 2016 9:36 pm

richmond62 wrote:Microsoft 365 is web-based, so it shouldn't really matter which OS your computer is running.

However: I've yet (after about 15 years) to work out what sufficient advantages there are in using Microsoft Office
over WPS (Kingsoft Office), EuroOffice, OpenOffice or LibreOffice to justify paying money.

My wife owns a Macbook Air that came with Microsoft Office bundled in it, and uses LibreOffice as she find the
interface far, far easier to use than the Microsoft one.

I'd go for single boot Linux, and IFF there is something that is 'vital' written for Windows that WINE cannot cope
with I'd run Windows in some sort of Virtualisation environment such as VMWare Player.


So Virtualbox would be fine?
Tracey Lowndes
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2014 8:11 pm

Re: What's the best way to dual boot Linux and Windows?

Postby richmond62 » Tue Nov 08, 2016 6:25 pm

So Virtualbox would be fine?


Yes: although I'd prefer Virtual Machine Manager: https://virt-manager.org
richmond62
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2016 4:56 pm
Location: Bulgaria

Re: What's the best way to dual boot Linux and Windows?

Postby reactiv8 » Tue Nov 08, 2016 7:37 pm

Tracey,

I started out my journey to Linux Nirvana 10 years ago with some trepidation.
So initially I installed another HDD in my desktop PC as I was terrified of losing my Windoze boot, and had Windoze on one and Linux on t'other.
However after dozens of installs since then I don't waste my time or money on extra hardware or software (M$) that I don't want.

These days I buy Zoostorm desktop PCs without an OS and install Linux Mint (my preferred distro).
The only other thing I do is install SSDs to speed up boots and read/write - Easily afforded by the £££s I have saved ;)

Chris.
“If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you.”
― Oscar Wilde, 'The Nightingale and the Rose'
User avatar
reactiv8
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2014 6:24 pm
Location: The Marches - Herefordshire-Powys border

Re: What's the best way to dual boot Linux and Windows?

Postby richmond62 » Wed Nov 09, 2016 10:57 am

About 23 years ago my wife and I went to the USA to study for Master's degrees.

Up to that point my computer experience had consisted of Research Machines, Main-Frames, BBC computers and Archimedes.

We were required to buy a computer to submit academic assignments: so I looked in a trade paper from a Supermarket
where there was a choice of an "IBM-compatible" running Windows 3.1 or a Macintosh. I didn't know what either of those
were, but as my Mum's maiden name was McIntosh I bought a Macintosh (as good a selection criteria as anything else).

So, about 11 years ago (having worked my way through 5 Macintoshes), we moved back (via the Middle-East and Scotland)
to my wife's country and I set up an English as a Foreign Language school. I bought a job-lot of Pentium IV machines for
20 quid a pop, and a lot of old cathode ray VDUs for the same sort of price for the simple reason that 8 Macs were well outside
the amount of money I was prepared to risk on a business venture.

I installed Ubuntu 6.10 on those machines, and after a week had everything up and running smoothly; and then sat down with Livecode
to make a suite of programs for content reinforcement and delivery on my G4 Macintosh "cooker".

A couple of years later my Macintosh went BANG (smoke, screaming and tears).

So I bought a PC and installed Windows XP on it: and after 2 weeks I trashed Windows and installed Linux (Xubuntu).

So I went from Macintosh to Linux, and still fail to understand why people are prepared to pay for a system (Windows)
which is like a pair of my old underpants I keep for cleaning the windows in my flat: grey and full of holes.

I do own Fontlab for Windows which I run with WINE.

To be honest I fail to understand all the nonsense about "difficult learning curves" changing from Macintosh to Windows to Linux to UNIX to whatever-else-you-wish-to-deploy;
unless one is particularly stupid, or too lazy to make any effort, there should be about a 4-6 hour "hiatus", nothing more.

I now use Linux about 90% of the time (I also use a G4 iMac because I own a large amount of software that I still use that only runs on Mac OS 9, 10.4 or 10.5 PPC).

My language school is still running: and so, oddly enough, are 5 out of 8 of the Pentium IVs I bought 11 years ago; I've updated the Linux they
run (currently Xubuntu 14.04), but they have never crashed and never frozen. The 3 that died died from physical failure not from using
daft software.

If one lives and works in the Windows ecosphere one either pays for software or relies on pirated versions: both of these options are, at the bottom line,
dependent on a flawed operating system that is vulnerable to Viruses, Trojans and so on.

In the Linux ecosphere 95% of software is completely FREE. It also does not go wonky because the underlying operating system is considerably
more robust than Windows is, or is likely to be.

I started out my journey to Linux Nirvana 10 years ago with some trepidation.


Well; 10-11 years ago there was quite a good reason for some trepidation; mainly because Linux as a desktop operating system was not as mature
as it is now. Now there really should be no reason to be trepidacious at all.
richmond62
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2016 4:56 pm
Location: Bulgaria


Return to Help

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron